Of course, none of this would have been possible without everyone involved. First, we’d like to thank all the owners for taking the time to join us. We also want to thank the Ohio Valley Region SCCA chapter for loaning us its equipment, including the timing system, cones, and radios. And last but not least, big props to Danny Popp and Todd Rumpke along with our entire staff and National Trail Raceway for all of their support. We already have next year’s date set in stone and we’re already itching to get back.

The Contenders

’70 DSE Camaro

Fast Facts
Horsepower: 700
Engine: Mast Motorsports 427ci LS
Suspension: front, DSE Hydroformed subframe with splined antiroll bar; rear, QUADRA Link; DSE coilover shocks and springs with Detroit Tuned valving
Brakes: front/rear Baer 6S with 14-inch rotors
Tires: BFGoodrich KDW, front, P335/30R18; rear, P295/35R18

From The Driver Seat

Henry D
Knowing that the ’70 Camaro had 700 hp on tap, I couldn’t wait to get strapped in and make the pass down the tarmac. Getting out of the hole proved to be a little tricky, with the first run hazing the tires, and it wasn’t until 80 feet out that the tires bit and started to accelerate. The shift into Second was smooth, however clicking into Third was a swing and a miss. What I didn’t realize was that it had a fairly long throw and it caught me off guard. On the second run, I dropped the launch to 2,000 rpm, giving it a slight bog, but it recovered almost immediately and pulled strong through the top of First. Going into Second was fun, barking the tires with the rear kicking out ever so slightly. Focusing on Third, it went right in, and it was smooth sailing through Fourth gear.

Danny Popp
I believe the ’70 DSE Camaro was the fastest vehicle on the autocross. The car seemed very well sorted, a product of being run routinely, and the car did everything very well. Balance of the car was good; brakes were outstanding and confidence-inspiring. The power in this car was probably the most unsettling; it had too much. When the motor would suddenly become happy it would move the car in a big way, if not on top of it. This requires a special touch, which fortunately Kyle Tucker and I both possess.

’73 Pozzi/Hotchkis Camaro

Fast Facts
Horsepower: 570
Engine: 402ci LS2
Suspension: front, Hotchkis upper/lower tubular control arms with hollow bar; rear, Hotchkis three-link, RideTech single-adjustable shocks, DSE subframe connectors, Global West subframe bushings
Brakes: Baer; front 6P with 13-inch rotors; rear, four-piston with 12-inch rotors
Tires: Falken Azenis RT-615K, front, P275/35R18; rear, P315/30R18

From The Driver Seat

Henry D
Unfortunately, this was the one car I didn’t get a chance to drive. Between the oncoming weather front looking grim and all the shuffling around, it just didn’t happen. I will say that I caught a quick glance of Mary making a few runs as I was jockeying between cars, and the smile on her face was absolutely priceless.

Danny Popp
Mary Pozzi’s Camaro was a treat to drive and it did everything well—very well sorted, great balance, and nice linear power. This car was easier to drive than the ’70 DSE Camaro because of its more tractable power, and Mary and I had a great time swinging her jewel around. The only slight drawback to this car was the braking. I thought having manual brakes would create some issues, but it didn’t and the brakes were very easy to modulate with the Hawk pads. The braking problem I encountered was centered around pad knock back, which created an inconsistent brake pedal on occasions. It wasn’t a huge problem, as this car was very near the top of the time sheet.