Seat Time

Hey guys, I have question about the front seats in your project Nova. I want to put some buckets in mine too (I have a ’72), and I really like the front seats that are in that one. Where can I find those, and the bases that they bolt to? Are those bases fabricated or can I find them online or at a parts store? I also couldn’t tell if they slide/adjust front to rear, do they?

Christian
Via email

The seats in our Nova are from Corbeau. Regarding the mounting brackets, you’ll be happy to know that Corbeau offers them, making the install incredibly easy, and they do slide back and forth. Matter of fact, we have the same seats in our F73 Camaro and absolutely dig them.

What’s on the Cover?

I enjoy reading Chevy High Performance cover to cover each month and then start over, just in case. On the Sept. ’11 issue, you had a ’55 Chevy on the cover, but the “On The Cover” blurb is about the ‘68 Camaro found in the issue. I can ignore spelling, but not missing or incorrect information. Please send me a revised issue (just joking).

T. Bonkosky
Hurleyville, NY

At times we like to mix it up by changing the cover images between the subscription and newsstand versions. Unfortunately, as you noticed, we didn’t address the correct feature car in the table of contents; don’t worry, we won’t do that again.

Got something to say? We’ll make you famous and put your letter here. Email us at chevyhi@sorc.com

Barrett-Jackson 2012

Missed your opportunity to attend or watch the Barrett- Jackson auction in 2011? Not a problem! Barrett-Jackson will be at the Westworld of Scottsdale in Scottsdale, Arizona, on January 16-22, 2012! Of course, SPEED Channel will be covering the entire event, too, live. Be sure to check out barrett-jackson.com for additional event scheduling and to order tickets online. Once on the website, fill in your mobile number to receive text message offers and discounts.

Covington’s “Innovator” Wins Goodguys 2011 Optima Batteries Street Machine of the Year

When Clover, South Carolina’s Alex Covington envisioned his dream ride, it was a ’67 Nova he could use as a daily driver. His vision quickly changed after he selected the Roadster Shop’s Jeremy and Phil Gerber to execute the build. The Gerbers’ vision for the Nova was a high-tech, low-slung futuristic street machine, combining an American classic with cutting-edge innovation and masterful build quality. Soon after, project “Innovator” began.

Covington’s faith in the Roadster Shop’s ability to deliver a top-quality car was rewarded when “Innovator” won the Goodguys 2011 Optima Batteries Street Machine of the Year award Saturday, July 9, at the Goodguys 14th PPG Nationals presented by Bridgestone in Columbus, Ohio.

Every panel on Covington’s Nova has been reworked and redesigned. The top was chopped 3/4 inch, the fenders were reshaped and sloped, new body lines and wheelwell openings were made, and a new rocker panel profile continues around the entire vehicle. The headlights and grille assembly are completely redesigned and hand-fabricated, as are the taillight bezels. The PPG white is complemented by custom satin accents of charcoal, sliver, and bright yellow.

Power is generated via a 700hp GM LSX in a completely handmade engine bay with machined panels and a custom intake. Inside the cabin is a handmade dash and console assembly, full rollcage, and race buckets covered in black and white leather. Illuminated headliner and floor inserts are as futuristic as it gets.

“Innovator” rides on a Roadster Shop Fast Track chassis with a three-link rear suspension and Watt’s linkage. Afco remote reservoir shocks cushion the ride. Giant Baer brakes provide extreme stopping power on track or on the street. Eric Brockmeyer designed the custom center lug seven-spoke wheels.

The car’s maiden voyage came Friday morning during the Street Machine of the Year Autocross competition. Having never been driven on pavement, tension was high in the Roadster Shop camp but anxiety quickly turned to confidence when Innovator streaked to a 35.3-second lap time. It would hold up as the fastest lap in the entire competition!

Rooster Call

Sean Haggai

Unfortunately, the project car game is two-sided. Eventually the small herd of cars you’ve been collecting, hoarding at your friend’s house, the front yard, and local shops, will have to be purged. The first step to addiction is admitting you have a problem. As of now, I’m sitting on four vehicles with shallow pockets.

As diehards of this industry, it’s just too easy to pick up new projects to play with. In some aspects, it’s what keeps the wheels upstairs turning. The more projects, the more motivation, right? Like my good friend, Bill Howell, just mentioned the other day, “It’s all about having a vision.” That’s true, too, because as loyal enthusiasts we have to look past the patina paint, various rust spots, missing trim, dilapidated interior, and flat tires to truly see the potential beneath the surface.

It can quickly spiral out of control from there. You end up greedy, blindly buying up whatever you see just because you can rather than because they have great potential. While spending $50-$100 here and there on one project car is possible, spending equal amounts on three or four at the same time can become emotionally and financially taxing. Catch my drift? I’m sure you’ve been in this same situation.

In an effort to practice what I preach, I’ve been in the process of trying to sell my black ’86 shortbed C10. It’s all about baby steps with a little here and there. Although I had a ton of plans for it, which included dropping in a fuel-injected 383ci small-block with a 700-4R overdrive transmission, I’ve since decided to drop that combo into my ’79 C20 longbed. I’ve grown attached to the little black truck, and I hate to see it go. However, when potential buyers are practically tugging on your sleeves you buck up and just let it go.

If all goes well, I’ll have the original drivetrain out of the longbed with the new stuff in shortly. Of course, that’s another story. We all know those weekend jobs can quickly turn into weeks. I’m keeping my fingers crossed.

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