The other month, I was saying that I was done buying cars—whoa, who am I kidding? I was really saying I couldn't look past a good opportunity, and that I was trying to find a way to justify the vehicles I own. Ultimately, I realized one thing: there is no rational reasoning when it comes to our passions.

What's new for this month? Let's just say that I picked up another project, only this time, it's for straight-line duty at the dragstrip. Say hello to Casper, a 2000 fourth-gen Camaro Z28 from Kent, Washington.

This had been in the works for quite some time. The owner, Jimmy Burns, originally had a 604ci big-block with a 114mm turbo combination that he was looking to compete with. Fast-forward to today, with most organizations being several states away, the fourth-gen sat by the wayside and he put his interest into a supercharged C5 Z06. Fortunately for us, we came to an agreement and have since taken over the chassis as a roller and plan to assemble it as our own drag radial ride.

In the past I've alluded to my own stock suspension car that has been campaigned for the past several years and recently ran 7.02 at 203.5 mph on 275s, making it the first West Coast car to break the 200 mph barrier on the little street sneakers. It's been a lot of fun and my buddy Kelly Henry will continue to push the limits with it in the True Ten Five class. This new Camaro, or Casper if you will, will be NMCA West legal in Street Outlaw and the West Coast Hot Rod Association X275, both of which are 275 drag radial classes.

The good news is the chassis is solid. And by solid, I mean the 25.5 chrome-moly cage has already been certified in the past and the car is flat-out pristine. In all reality, we're talking a little elbow grease in order to get this gem back onto the track. Even so, I want to do it right, and we're planning to tear it down to its bare shell and go through everything. We'll address the suspension, wiring, and plumbing, along with any ancillary items we need to replace. Of course, safety is an issue, and we'll meet all NHRA requirements.

Regarding the powerplant, if time permits, we'll drop in a big-block to get a few shakedown passes to sort out the chassis; however, the final mill will be a tall-deck RHS LS block with their latest big-bore LS7 cylinder heads. Our power adder of choice for this combo will be a supercharger; only I'll have to leave you with that since I can't give away all the secrets—just yet. Rest assured, we're talking hardcore dragstrip tech that'll encompass everything from building the ride to getting it down the track. My question for you: What type of stories would you like to see from this build? You know the drill, simply email me at the address listed above.