We just can’t get enough of the Z06. While our resident Corvette is relatively new to the pages of Chevy High Performance, our first experience behind the wheel of this ride was during the 2005 Hot Rod Power Tour. Since then, we’ve gained a lot of valuable seat time at various cruises, including a number of autocross and drag racing sessions.

What did we learn? Foremost, the General really put together one outstanding package. And given the horsepower-to-weight ratio, it’s a tough combination to beatat least until now. Much like every vehicle we own, as we began to improve on the factory offerings, such as installing the LG Motorsports GT2 coilover suspension (Confidence Inspiring, Feb. ’10), we learned that we were able to apply the throttle much sooner through the turns, which incidentally also ignited our appetite for added power.

Rather than doing a cylinder head, camshaft, and manifold swap, we were heavily influenced by the latest C6 ZR1 powerplant. Resting on top of the LS9 is a four-lobe supercharger that generates gobs of power and is the envy of the supercar community. Once we learned that same technology was readily available, it only seemed fitting to install the same MagnaCharger MP 2300 TVS supercharger onto our LS6 mill.

If you aren’t familiar with the TVS 2300, let’s start by saying it’s a very capable blower that’s already proven to generate in excess of 900 hp. Similar to the earlier three-lobe design that feature lobes with a 60-degree helix shape, the TVS 2300 takes it to the next level by utilizing four lobes with a much more aggressive 160-degree twist of the rotors. As the rotors turn, it’s this spinning motion that speeds up the air and forces it through the intake side of the cylinder heads. We also dig that these superchargers have a reputation for being extremely efficient and have a tendency to generate an incredible amount of big-blocklike low-end torque as early as 2,000 rpm. What’s not to like about that?

To handle our install, we went directly to the source at Magnuson Products in Ventura, California, where the experienced crew was able to complete the install in a day. For those looking to handle the installation personally, you’ll definitely appreciate the detailed 52-page manual that will help you get the job done correctly the first time.

If you’re on the edge debating whether or not the TVS 2300 is the ideal supercharger system for your C5 or C6; let’s just say all doubts will be put to rest the moment you throttle it.

Under Cover

To fit the MagnaCharger TVS system, you’ll have to swap out the factory hood for an aftermarket setup. Of the number of hood options, based on MagnaCharger’s recommendation we ordered Lingenfelter’s Supercharger Hood by Starcraft. These hoods were originally designed to accommodate MagnaCharger’s M112 system, but based on the housing specs, we knew it would be close and wanted to see how the hood would fit the TVS 2300. The good news is, the Linginfelter hood bolted right on with minimal effort, lining up perfectly against the factory body line. The only issue we ran into was at the rear of the cowl while at speed; the air would push the hood down just enough to slightly haze the rear pulleys. The quick and easy fix was to clearance the area with a high-speed rotary tool (e.g., Dremel), but we’ll get into finer details during our upcoming Paint & Body issue, where Best of Show Coachworks in San Marcos, California, applied the shine to our new hood.